Season 2, Episode 1: Justice for Jamal Khashoggi

Journalist Mehdi Hasan joins Heather Chaplin and Emily Bell to discuss the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi and explore what its coverage says about the American media’s evolving relationship with the Saudi Arabian government. Plus, our hosts reveal two new recurring segments for the show. It’s the beginning of a whole new season of Tricky!


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Brazilian Swamp Drainer—The Wall Street Journal‘s endorsement of neo-fascist Jair Bolsonaro.

Here’s BBC’s highly detailed primer on the murder of journalism Jamal Khashoggi.

Plus, this Amnesty International video of prominent journalists reading the last piece Khashoggi filed to his editor before his death.

Coming Soon: Tricky Season Two

Just in time for midterm mayhem, fearless podcast hosts Heather Chaplin and Emily Bell have returned to untangle journalism’s knottiest problems in season two of Journalism + Design’s Tricky.

Season one saw the duo address messy issues—the purpose of journalists, media credibility, the impending infocalypse, and tackling misinformation among them—with guests like New York University’s Jay Rosen and Katie Kingsbury of the New York Times. The show’s second season promises to delve into no less fearsome topics.

Starting Friday, November 2, new episodes will air every other week.

Hear what’s on the docket in the official season two trailer below and subscribe to Tricky on iTunes or Radio Public for updates.


 

 

Season 1, Episode 10: What Are Journalists For?

On the finale of the first season of Tricky, Emily and Heather are joined by media critic and NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen to discuss the reporting that exposed the Trump administration’s atrocities at the border and the role of the American press in an era of competing realities.


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Season 1, Episode 9: Journalist Credibility Ratings Dive

How many fact-checking organizations does it take to change the proverbial fake news lightbulb? Elon Musk thinks we need at least one more.

But maybe fact-checking should function more like a popularity contest, with journalists and institutions competing for credibility ratings. Emily and Heather ask what is the point of recent fact-checking initiatives, and the director of Poynter’s international fact-checking network Alexios Mantzarlis offers some answers.


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Elon Musk doesn’t know how journalism works — but thinks he can fix it  — A primer on the tweets that started it all.

Plus, responses from Nate Silver, Buzzfeed, and Poynter.

Who decides what’s true in politics? A history of the rise of political fact-checking  — An interview with a fact-checking expert to demystify the partisan bickering.

A 2018 survey of fact-checking projects around the world finds a booming field, with at least 149 dedicated initiatives  — More background on the credibility verification efforts from organizations around the globe.

 

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Season 1, Episode 8: The Unraveling of Univision

Heather and Emily are joined by David Uberti of Splinter News, one of the authors of “Univision is a Fucking Mess” about his employer. But, seeking silver linings wherever they go, they also talk with Almudena Toral from Univision News Digital about some of the award-winning investigative work coming out of the Miami newsroom. Plus, Emily has all the latest on the Royal Wedding.


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Season 1, Episode 7: A Bonfire of Hot Takes

Emily and Heather consider what place opinion journalism has in public discourse today.With Jeet Heer of The New Republic, and Katie Kingsbury of the New York Times, the two ask: Is intellectual diversity possible? Can, and should, legacy news organizations provide thought leadership? When do provocations and thought experiments actually foster debate and when are they just straight trolling? And what’s that smell? Is it the daily bonfire of hot takes? 


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Season 1, Episode 6: Preparing for the Infocalypse

Heather and Emily hunker down in the journalistic equivalent of a nuclear bunker with Storyful’s Mandy Jenkins and design technologist Rick Barraza to explore the looming crisis of AI-generated fakery that threatens our understanding of what’s real.


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Season 1, Episode 5: What’s in the Sinclair Broadcasting Box?

A perverted sex act in a company-owned Mercedes, and a shriveled local media ecosystem. Heather and Emily are joined by Washington Post media critic Margaret Sullivan and Texas Tribune founder John Thornton to unpack the tricky problem of how to save local news from bankruptcy and bias.


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Season 1, Episode 4: Propaganda, Misinformation and Tips for Tackling Fake News

Heather Chaplin and Emily Bell talk to Jason Stanley, professor of philosophy at Yale, about misinformation, conspiracy theories, and how journalism can survive in systems flooded with propaganda, with tips on tackling fake news from Ida B. Wells and Frederick Douglass. And Emily gives us an audio whiteboard sketch of the complexities of the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook data story.


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Season 1, Episode 3: Please Don’t Read the Comments

In this episode of Tricky, Heather and Emily talk to Sarah L. Roberts, the woman who coined the term “commercial content moderation,” about how elements of online discourse are governed by outsourced and unseen low-paid workers, who sift through “the grossness of humanity.”

And they ask Andrew Losowsky of the Coral Project whether newsrooms and journalists still have a part to play in fostering civil discourse, on and offline. Plus: the bubonic plague, dance mania, Karen Carpenter, and pointy shoes.


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